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Asian Viagra

Asian Viagra

Tongkat Ali is a tree which is indigenous to Asia and is sometimes referred to as Long Jack or Malaysian Ginseng. This evergreen has been used in traditional Chinese medicine as an aphrodisiac for centuries. Tradition has it that the tree must reach a maturity of at least ten years before its roots are harvested for medicinal purposes in order to allow them to reach their full potency. Tongkat Ali has also been used to raise energy levels, reduce stress, and increase sperm count.

Erectile Dysfunction and Stress

Erectile dysfunction is linked to both psychological and physiological factors. It can be the result of negative physical or mental issues as well as a combination of the two. Stress is one very common factor in men suffering from erectile dysfunction. Next in the line of emotional factors are PTSD, anger, and depression.
The US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health published a study which was led by a number of scientists on the effects of stress management and erectile dysfunction. All participants were given a prescription medication for ED and half also underwent an 8 week long stress management program. While both groups presented with marked improvements, those who managed their stress demonstrated a significant improvement over the group who did not. Another study, published by the same institution, showed that those men who ingested antioxidants to combat Oxidative stress presented with marked improvement of ED symptoms.

Tongkat Ali and Stress

Tongkat Ali contains an antioxidant known as Superoxide Dismutase which can combat Oxidative stress in the human body. Research conducted by the US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health demonstrated that Tongkat Ali is also an effective treatment to reduce chronic stress, increase testosterone by 37%, and improve overall psychological states. These are important findings since testosterone is key to male sexual function and many psychological factors greatly impact ED symptoms. For the purposes of this study chronic stress was broken down into three categories. Confusion was reduced by 15%, tension by 11%, and anger by 12%.

Tongkat Ali and ED

The US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health conducted a study to research the effects of Tongkat Ali as a treatment for erectile dysfunction. Like several other studies this one determined that the properties of this plant raise testosterone levels. In this case it was given to rats who then were carefully observed. Tongkat Ali decreased ejaculation latencies and increased mounting behavior as well as ejaculation itself. It also reduced the time between ejaculations.
The effects of Tongkat Ali on erectile dysfunction symptoms have been scientifically validated through the above mentioned studies as well as many others. It seems that it does not simply act in a single way to reduce the symptoms, but in several different ways and on more than just the reproductive system. Key actions are the rise in testosterone levels, the reduction of negative psychological factors, and an increase in stamina from supplementation with this Malaysian miracle.

Cited Sources:

Kalaitzidou, I. “Stress Management and Erectile Dysfunction: A Pilot Comparative Study.” Pub Med. US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, 3 July 2013. Web. 25 Feb. 2015. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23822751
Azadzoi, KM. “Oxidative Stress in Arteriogenic Erectile Dysfunction: Prophylactic Role of Antioxidants.” Pub Med. US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, 1 July 2005. Web. 25 Feb. 2015. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15947695
Talbott, SM. “Effect of Tongkat Ali on Stress Hormones and Psychological Mood State in Moderately Stressed Subjects.” Pub Med. US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, 26 May 2013. Web. 25 Feb. 2015. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23705671
Zanoli, P. “Influence of Eurycoma Longifolia on the Copulatory Activity of Sexually Sluggish and Impotent Male Rats.” Pub Med. US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, 12 Nov. 2012. Web. 25 Feb. 2015. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19703544

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